Course shell completion

I would like to thank all those who assisted in the development of my course shell. Jen was very helpful and available which was nice.

I am glad to be part of this movement to reduce student book fees and provide information to fellow Faculty members to enhance education. Good luck and have a great Summer!

https://filehost.lanecc.edu/public.php?service=files&t=508dffbead6104c94867963c71906e8d

The Finish Line

After much hard work and a lot of fun, I’ve finished developing my OER WR122 course and have begun to implement it this term.

Students were ecstatic to not have to spend money on a textbook for the course and have found the OER resources I compiled quite helpful.  In their first reflections in the course, several of them spoke to how important specific OERs have been to their journey in the course and to helping them become better writers.

In my feedback on student drafts, I’ve directed many of my students to specific OER links on the NCU Writing Center website that was one of my favorite finds in the process.  I love that this website gives students the opportunity to focus in on the specific writing areas, like introductions, citations, incorporating sources, and writing thesis statements that they are struggling with as individual writers.

I met with Jen today, who generously tutored me through the creation of my first screencast, where I got so speak about the challenges and victories of my OER journey, as well as offer advice to others considering the OER route and speak to how I’ve begun to implement the course.  The screencast can be viewed here.

Thanks for following me in my journey through this OER cohort.  I hope I’ve inspired you to begin your own OER journey.

Final reflection on OERs for Introduction to Biology

As the term wraps up, I’m still very glad that I used OERs for my Introduction to Biology class. Mainly relying on the Open Stax Biology and Concepts of Biology resources worked well. Here are a few things that popped up as unanticipated in the last part of the term.
1) I was really excited to get questions via email, Moodle messages, and in person about from other faculty about my project. Sometimes I don’t get to collaborate with my colleagues on curriculum as much as I’d like (busy schedules, the reality of life as part-time educator). It is fun to be doing something that gets conversations started with others!
2) As the students progressed in the term, I felt like I got more and more answers on labs and exams that I didn’t necessarily anticipate. They were not incorrect, just answered at a depth that incorporated research or detail that wasn’t in the sources I provided which were at the introductory level. I give some online quizzes and exams to save class time for labs and activities and some of the assumptions I made in writing some of the questions were challenged (for example, thinking students won’t consider the minor contribution of a particular hormone to a particular disease and would focus on the big picture). I don’t necessarily think this is a bad thing, but writing and grading assessments is now a bit more time consuming and occasionally correct answers can be automatically marked wrong until they are reviewed. In fairness, this sometimes happened before I used OERs exclusively in my class, but the challenges I’ve faced in this realm seem to have increased as students embraced the OER world.
3) Students that did prefer to work from printed copies of the OER wanted to know what to do with the copies at the end of the term. Some felt it was wasteful to have printed the copies out and then to have no further use. Since I plan to continue to teach the class again using the resources I’ve said that I’d pass copies along to future students.
Overall, I consider this OER project a success and I learned a lot. I’m sure I’ll use and improve what I’ve developed for this course in the future. I love the challenge of trying to make a course better every term I teach it, and with the variety of OERs available I will be able to look to these resources in supporting innovations to my courses.

Here is a quick tour of the course Moodle site that presents the OERs I used to the students:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yERIMDR2k8A&feature=youtu.be&hd=1

Final reflection on OERs for Introduction to Biology

As the term wraps up, I’m still very glad that I used OERs for my Introduction to Biology class. Mainly relying on the Open Stax Biology and Concepts of Biology resources worked well. Here are a few things that popped up as unanticipated in the last part of the term.
1) I was really excited to get questions via email, Moodle messages, and in person about from other faculty about my project. Sometimes I don’t get to collaborate with my colleagues on curriculum as much as I’d like (busy schedules, the reality of life as part-time educator). It is fun to be doing something that gets conversations started with others!
2) As the students progressed in the term, I felt like I got more and more answers on labs and exams that I didn’t necessarily anticipate. They were not incorrect, just answered at a depth that incorporated research or detail that wasn’t in the sources I provided which were at the introductory level. I give some online quizzes and exams to save class time for labs and activities and some of the assumptions I made in writing some of the questions were challenged (for example, thinking students won’t consider the minor contribution of a particular hormone to a particular disease and would focus on the big picture). I don’t necessarily think this is a bad thing, but writing and grading assessments is now a bit more time consuming and occasionally correct answers can be automatically marked wrong until they are reviewed. In fairness, this sometimes happened before I used OERs exclusively in my class, but the challenges I’ve faced in this realm seem to have increased as students embraced the OER world.
3) Students that did prefer to work from printed copies of the OER wanted to know what to do with the copies at the end of the term. Some felt it was wasteful to have printed the copies out and then to have no further use. Since I plan to continue to teach the class again using the resources I’ve said that I’d pass copies along to future students.
Overall, I consider this OER project a success and I learned a lot. I’m sure I’ll use and improve what I’ve developed for this course in the future. I love the challenge of trying to make a course better every term I teach it, and with the variety of OERs available I will be able to look to these resources in supporting innovations to my courses.

Here is a quick tour of the course Moodle site that presents the OERs I used to the students:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yERIMDR2k8A&feature=youtu.be&hd=1