ENGLISH MAJOR ARTICULATION WITH UO

English University of Oregon http://uoregon.edu/~engl/
Lane counselor: Anthony Hampton hamptona@lanecc.edu      463-5275             Office: Center Bldg. Rm. 406
Lane advisor:   Cindy Lott      lottc@lanecc.edu              463-5232          Office: Center Bldg. Rm. 454
Bachelor of Arts degree only: Requires two years of foreign language 
UO Title                                       UO                                  Lane equivalency         Title
Intro. to English Major                            ENG 220, 221, 222
 (See note 2)   
Select one course:
Shakespeare                                              ENG 207, 208
Select two additional courses:
World Literature                        ENG 107, 108, 109
Topics in Ethnic American Literature:   ENG 245
Topics vary from term to term
Shakespeare                                                ENG 207, 208
Introduction to Folklore                           ENG 250
Survey of American Literature                ENG 215, 216


Additional elective courses at UO:
ENG 110 Introduction to Film and Media
ENG 200 Public Speaking as a Liberal Art
ENG 225 The Age of King Arthur
ENG 230 Introduction to Environmental Literature
ENG 241 Introduction to African American Literature
ENG 242 Introduction to Asian American Literature
ENG 243 Introduction to Chicano/Latino Literature
ENG 244 Introduction to Native American Literature
ENG 246 Topics in Global Literature in English
ENG 260 Media Aesthetics
ENG 265, 266, 267 History of the Motion Picture
ENG 280 Introduction to Comics Studies

Must take all four courses   (See note 2)   
  • ENG 204 & 205     Survey of British Literature
  • ENG 253 & 254     Survey of American Literature
 Plus:   Select one course:   
  • ENG 201, 202, 203       Shakespeare
Plus:   Select two additional courses:   
  • ENG 100                         Children’s Literature
  • ENG 107, 108, 109       Survey of World Literature
  • ENG 121                         Detective Fiction
  • ENG 151            African American Literature
  • ENG 194                         Literature of Comedy
  • ENG 195, 196, 197         Introduction to Film Studies
  • ENG 201, 202, 203         Shakespeare
  • ENG 213            Survey of Asian Literature
  • ENG 215                         Latino/a Literature
  • ENG 222                         Literature and Gender
  • ENG 232                         Native American Literature
  • ENG 240                         Nature Literature
  • ENG 243                         Native American Autobiography
  • ENG 244                         Asian American Literature
  • ENG 250            Introduction to Folklore and Mythology
  • ENG 257                         The American Working Class
  • ENG 258                         Working Class Lives in Film
  • ENG 259                         African-American Journey
  • ENG 260                         Intro to Women Writers
  • ENG 261                         Science Fiction
  • ENG 270                         Bob Dylan: American Poet
  • ENG 271-273 & 276     Film Genre
  • FA 263                             Film in the 50s
  • FA 264                             Women Make Movies
  • FA 265                          African American Film Images
 
NOTES:
  1. All major coursework must be passed with a mid-C or better.
  2. Lane transfer students should complete both sequences –all four courses (ENG 204 & 205 and ENG 253 & 254)) to meet UO Intro to English Major sequence (ENG 220, 221 & 222). Usually, no substitution is allowed for any part or parts of the Introduction sequence, and the four-course equivalency must be completed at the time of admission to the University. No part of this requirement or its equivalency may be satisfied by course credits received by exam (CLEP credits and/or similar college-level examinations for credit).
  3. Effective fall, 2002, students admitted to the University under the direct transfer plan are not able to count more than one major course in the general education group requirements. For English majors, this means only one course with an ENG prefix may be used to fulfill their Arts & Letters group requirement.

 

CURRENT AMERICAN LIT 254 COURSE OUTCOMES

Course Outline

 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

 

COURSE TITLE: Survey of American Literature COURSE HOURS PER WEEK: 4
COURSE NUMBER: English 254 Lecture: 4
COURSE CREDITS: 4 Lec/Lab:
COURSE PREREQUISITES: Lab:

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Survey of American Literature is a two-term sequence to acquaint students with representative works of important American writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials, with an introduction to practices of literary interpretations. Questions of genre, authorship, aesthetics, and literary movements may be examined in their relationships to social, political, and intellectual movements of the United States. The first term will draw on material from colonial settlement in the Americas through the Civil War period. The second term will include literature from the end of the 19th century to the present.

 

 

 

GENERAL COURSE OUTCOMES:

 

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to: These outcomes will be verified by one or more of the following assessments:
  1. Be able to distinguish between connotation and denotation and demonstrate how the connotative language helps shape major points of a literary text (poem, story, play).
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Demonstrate ability to use interpretive frameworks to investigate contextual meanings of literature.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Recognize historical and mythological viewpoints and central themes and how these viewpoints establish different worldviews and value systems.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Understand international influences on the United States, including immigration and power relations between countries.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Understand the complexity of national issues and their influence on the literature, particularly political, educational, and religious goals, the use of different languages, the establishment of social goals, and legal and economic systems.
  2. Explore how the literature reflects and shapes perceptions of critical social issues such as slavery, treatment of Native Americans, attitudes toward immigrants, and the rights of women.
  3. Consider the role of community in literature, what are considered the center and the margins of community, and the boundaries between groups of people as well as what establishes a sense of belonging.
  4. Appreciate the different ways freedom is defined and established, including rights, choices, and civic order and responsibilities.
  5. Understand oneself better as an American, or a person living in American, and as a human being.
  6. Consider personal identity issues based on race, class, gender, religion, education, and sexual preference, and how those issues are addressed in literature.
  7. Experience different writers’ sense of place, land and a sense of home.
  8. Understand why certain American authors have been included in the literary canon and others excluded, specifically women and ethnic minorities.
  9. Develop an understanding of the major changes in literary genres and style, why certain genres are studied in the academy and others excluded, and why certain stories are repeated each generation in different forms.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.

Course outline by major topic

 

  • Realism
  • Naturalism
  • Immigration
  • The American Dream
  • The Frontier
  • Reconstruction
  • Modernism
  • Ethnic literature
  • The Red Scare/Cold War
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • The Civil Rights Movement
  • Protest literature
  • Women’s Movement
  • Post Modernism

 

 

 

CURRENT AMERICAN LIT 253 OUTCOMES

Course Outline

 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

 

COURSE TITLE: Survey of American Literature COURSE HOURS PER WEEK: 4
COURSE NUMBER: English 253 Lecture: 4
COURSE CREDITS: 4 Lec/Lab:
COURSE PREREQUISITES: Lab:

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

 

Survey of American Literature is a two-term sequence to acquaint students with representative works of important American writers, literary forms, and significant currents of thought. Primary emphasis is on reading and engaging with the literary materials, with an introduction to practices of literary interpretations. Questions of genre, authorship, aesthetics, and literary movements may be examined in their relationships to social, political, and intellectual movements of the United States. The first term will draw on material from colonial settlement in the Americas through the Civil War period. The second term will include literature from the end of the 19th century to the present.

 

 

 

GENERAL COURSE OUTCOMES:

 

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to: These outcomes will be verified by one or more of the following assessments:
  1. Be able to distinguish between connotation and denotation and demonstrate how the connotative language helps shape major points of a literary text (poem, story, play).
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Demonstrate ability to use interpretive frameworks to investigate contextual meanings of literature.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Recognize historical and mythological viewpoints and central themes and how these viewpoints establish different worldviews and value systems.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Understand international influences on the United States, including immigration and power relations between countries.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.
  1. Understand the complexity of national issues and their influence on the literature, particularly political, educational, and religious goals, the use of different languages, the establishment of social goals, and legal and economic systems.
  2. Explore how the literature reflects and shapes perceptions of critical social issues such as slavery, treatment of Native Americans, attitudes toward immigrants, and the rights of women.
  3. Consider the role of community in literature, what are considered the center and the margins of community, and the boundaries between groups of people as well as what establishes a sense of belonging.
  4. Appreciate the different ways freedom is defined and established, including rights, choices, and civic order and responsibilities.
  5. Understand oneself better as an American, or a person living in American, and as a human being.
  6. Consider persona identity issues based on race, class, gender, religion, education, and sexual preference, and how those issues are addressed in literature.
  7. Experience different writers’ sense of place, the land and sense of home.
  8. Understand why certain American authors have been included in the literary canon and others excluded, specifically women and ethnic minorities.
  9. Develop an understanding of the major changes in literary genres and style, why certain genres are studied in the academy and others excluded, and why certain stories are repeated each generation in different forms.
In-class participation, presentations, projects, quizzes, formal and informal writing, in-class discussions, exams.

Course outline by major topic

 

  1. Colonization
  2. Exploration/Conquest
  3. New World Culture
  4. New World Literatures
  5. Calvinism of Puritans/Pilgrims
  6. The Wilderness
  7. Captivity Narrative
  8. Enlightenment Influences
  9. Revolutionary Texts
  10. Slavery
  11. Slave Narrative
  12. Transcendentalism
  13. True and New Womanhood
  14. Industrialization
  15. The making of an American Identity
  16. Civil War
  17. Immigration