Author Archives: keaseyfreed

Final Project – Le Jelli

 

I had a lot of fun with this project. Finally getting to apply the skills I have learned over the past year, both inside and outside of class, was extremely rewarding. It was also very cool to have the opportunity to poke fun at pretentious art-house films, because that is a style I very much love, but also see the flaws in. I was originally going to create a voice over monologue that would have played throughout the short, but I did not have enough time to write and record one. I also really thought about whether the monologue would have added, or taken away from, the final product. I figured that if the monologue was not recorded with nice equipment it would have made the whole production seem even more amateur than it already is. I firmly believe it is better to create something simple and polished, rather than overreach and create something that looks like crap. That is not to say that my final looks perfect – it has more than a few flaws. I was disappointed with the shakiness of a couple of the ECU shots specifically. All in all I am proud of what I have created, and I am very excited to continue making more stuff.

Amy Mintonye’s “The Rising Tide”

AMRT1.jpg

Amy Mintonye’s Fowl Play, which is currently on display in Lane’s Main Gallery. Collage and acrylic paint on paper.

There were so many options when it came to choosing an event to cover for this assignment. Almost too many, in fact, and I left the assignment sitting on the back burner of my mind until I realized it was due in only a few short days. As I walked about campus, nervously contemplating joining a circus instead of continuing my career as a college student, something caught my eye: a dominant male hand forcing a child’s head back while multiple birds regurgitated food into his mouth.

I guess you could say that is my kind of art.

As I looked around the gallery in building 10, I quickly began to fall in love with Amy Mintonye’s collages. They are extremely chaotic and vibrant, and remind me very much of Terry Gilliam’s work on Monty Python. Later on I found out that she would be conducting a lecture of sorts in the building 10 gallery on the 18th, so I decided then that I would use this assignment as an opportunity to find what this mysterious artist is all about.

The lecture itself was interesting enough, but at only a half hour it was surprisingly short. The folks in attendance were mostly from some sort of photojournalist class. The teacher of this class, who seemed like the one in charge of the event, really rushed things and didn’t give much time to talk with Amy about her work. I was disappointed to say the least, but managed to obtain some interesting information. Amy grew up on the East Coast, specifically Rochester, NY. As a child she said she loved playing with Legos and Lincoln Logs, for she enjoyed using building blocks to create things. I believe this is where her passion for collage came from. She mostly works with magazine clippings from the 150s-80s, searching stores like Portland’s SCRAP for old issues of Fortune and the like. She loves the mono color, classic feel of these images, and her works ends up being very powerful because she takes these images so far out of context.

Amy said she usually finds one specific image that gets a string emotional reaction from her, like the boy in Fowl Play, and builds a scene around it. Her current installment “The Rising Tide” is mostly focused on the effects of global climate change, this specifically rings true in Thin Ice, which depicts a group of people roller skating on the shard of a glacier.

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Amy Mintonye’s Thin Ice

After the brief lecture, I took it upon myself to ask Amy more questions, which she was very happy to answer. She got her BFA at SUNY New Paltz, and currently resides in Portland. She has had multiple gallery installments in places like the Vancouver Public Library and Walter’s Art Center in Hillsboro. Though she would love to create art full time, she is an advertiser for the Pittock Mansion Museum in Portland. She said that she does very much enjoy doing this for a living, and that because it involves a lot of visual design she feels that her artistic skills played a key role in her getting hired on.

I found speaking with Amy Mintonye to be very inspiring, because she gets to do something she loves doing with her life and is being recognized for it. I hope that one day I will be lucky enough to get recognized for things that I love to do as well. Everyone should absolutely check her work out in the glass gallery in building 11, for it will b up until December 9th. For more information on Amy and her work, please go to amymintonye.com

5 Things to do with Your Hands

 

For this project I decided to do something funny, as compared to my last assignment. I got a lot of inspiration from HowToBasic, a very odd and NSFW YouTube channel. I really find this type of absurdist humor to be hilarious, like Tim and Eric, or the Eric Andre Show. It did not take long to shoot this at all, and I left the camera in one spot to give it a ‘How-To’ feel. The most difficult part was probably adding and cutting the music, which I did in Audacity. It was really fun to create a little space in my room to shoot, and I am grateful that the Multimedia Department has awesome equipment for me to borrow! I hope you enjoy my short!

The Raven

Since Halloween is this weekend, I decided to recite Edgar Allan Poe’s famous poem “The Raven” for my audio project. I have always been a fan of Poe, and when I was a kid this poem used to creep me out quite a bit. I used five audio tracks; thunder, a quiet rainfall track, a Raven’s caw, my voice audio reciting the poem and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. I felt that this created a very creepy atmosphere, and also sounds similar to what Poe himself was experiencing that frightful evening when the raven sat upon the bust above his door. I would like to issue a warning, though, that I am NOT an actor. The most difficult part of this assignment was to try and convey emotion while I was reading the poem (and trying to breathe away from the mic). In that sense I am not quite satisfied with the final outcome, but the sound effects and the music go together quite nicely, and I was very excited to hear that I had created a very compelling background. If I was to do this again I would have probably taken more time to memorize the poem so that I could have put more emphasis in certain places. All in all it was a fun experience!

By Keasey Freed

The Raven

Since Halloween is this weekend, I decided to recite Edgar Allan Poe’s famous poem “The Raven” for my audio project. I have always been a fan of Poe, and when I was a kid this poem used to creep me out quite a bit. I used five audio tracks; thunder, a quiet rainfall track, a Raven’s caw, my voice audio reciting the poem and Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. I felt that this created a very creepy atmosphere, and also sounds similar to what Poe himself was experiencing that frightful evening when the raven sat upon the bust above his door. I would like to issue a warning, though, that I am NOT an actor. The most difficult part of this assignment was to try and convey emotion while I was reading the poem (and trying to breathe away from the mic). In that sense I am not quite satisfied with the final outcome, but the sound effects and the music go together quite nicely, and I was very excited to hear that I had created a very compelling background. If I was to do this again I would have probably taken more time to memorize the poem so that I could have put more emphasis in certain places. All in all it was a fun experience!

By Keasey Freed

Reverse Shot

Screen Shot 2015-10-20 at 8.40.35 AM

One professional blog I find to be a great resource is reverseshot.org, which is a publication of the Museum of the Moving Image. The museum itself is located in Queens, and is devoted to film, television and digital media. With its many reviews, symposiums and interviews, Reverse Shot is a necessary resource for any aspiring filmmaker. The website is sleek and easy to navigate, and has a very professional feel. It has a number of contributors, all of whom seem quite knowledgable in the realm of film history.

The reviews are very in-depth, and  rarely of blockbusters. In a review of Bridge of Spies, the latest Spielberg film, contributor Jeff Reichert had this to say; “We’re near-always safe with Spielberg; his films are built around an unparalleled clarity of space, and when their imagery functions to disorient our perspective it’s only in order to make the reorientation even more effectively stabilizing. He aims to please.”

The Symposiums are also very informative, and usually focus on a theme or director. In Ring Cycle, an analysis of Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull, contributor Michael Koresky praises the film’s emotional brutality and iconic boxing scenes. He also goes on to say that the film’s depiction of non-fictional boxer Jake LaMotta elevated the emotional response of the audience;

“Jake LaMotta is no made-up character—in fictionalizing a real man, Scorsese at once elevates him and brings him down to earth. You could use the term larger than life, but life seems to swallow him up. As expressed in the film’s justly famous credit sequence—in which a distant LaMotta bounces and shadowboxes in elegant slow motion on the left side of the 1.85:1 frame, accompanied by the effusive flourish of Pietro Mascagni’s “Cavalleria rusticana”he is eternally, like all of us, a small man in the corner.”

Ring Cycle is just one post in a series called “Martin Scorsese: He is Cinema,” which analyzes every Scorsese film. This type of insight is necessary if one wants to learn from the greats of filmmaking.

Reverse Shot

Screen Shot 2015-10-20 at 8.40.35 AM

One professional blog I find to be a great resource is reverseshot.org, which is a publication of the Museum of the Moving Image. The museum itself is located in Queens, and is devoted to film, television and digital media. With its many reviews, symposiums and interviews, Reverse Shot is a necessary resource for any aspiring filmmaker. The website is sleek and easy to navigate, and has a very professional feel. It has a number of contributors, all of whom seem quite knowledgable in the realm of film history.

The reviews are very in-depth, and  rarely of blockbusters. In a review of Bridge of Spies, the latest Spielberg film, contributor Jeff Reichert had this to say; “We’re near-always safe with Spielberg; his films are built around an unparalleled clarity of space, and when their imagery functions to disorient our perspective it’s only in order to make the reorientation even more effectively stabilizing. He aims to please.”

The Symposiums are also very informative, and usually focus on a theme or director. In Ring Cycle, an analysis of Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull, contributor Michael Koresky praises the film’s emotional brutality and iconic boxing scenes. He also goes on to say that the film’s depiction of non-fictional boxer Jake LaMotta elevated the emotional response of the audience;

“Jake LaMotta is no made-up character—in fictionalizing a real man, Scorsese at once elevates him and brings him down to earth. You could use the term larger than life, but life seems to swallow him up. As expressed in the film’s justly famous credit sequence—in which a distant LaMotta bounces and shadowboxes in elegant slow motion on the left side of the 1.85:1 frame, accompanied by the effusive flourish of Pietro Mascagni’s “Cavalleria rusticana”he is eternally, like all of us, a small man in the corner.”

Ring Cycle is just one post in a series called “Martin Scorsese: He is Cinema,” which analyzes every Scorsese film. This type of insight is necessary if one wants to learn from the greats of filmmaking.

Multimedia Scavenger Hunt

P1010413

The Media Creation Lab

 P1010393

The Blue Cyc Wall (I was locked out!)

P1010400

The Equipment Checkout Counter

P1010425

The Main Art Gallery

    P1010414

The Art-O-Mat

P1010405

The Library

P1010432

The Sculpture Outside of the Health and Wellness Building

P1010419

Mary Jo’s Office

P1010407

The Center For Student Engagement

P1010444

Christina Salter’s Office

P1010391

The Indy Lab

P1010436

Some Flags

P1010396

Heavy Construction Machinery

P1010445

Our Beautiful Surroundings

Multimedia Scavenger Hunt

P1010413

The Media Creation Lab

 P1010393

The Blue Cyc Wall (I was locked out!)

P1010400

The Equipment Checkout Counter

P1010425

The Main Art Gallery

    P1010414

The Art-O-Mat

P1010405

The Library

P1010432

The Sculpture Outside of the Health and Wellness Building

P1010419

Mary Jo’s Office

P1010407

The Center For Student Engagement

P1010444

Christina Salter’s Office

P1010391

The Indy Lab

P1010436

Some Flags

P1010396

Heavy Construction Machinery

P1010445

Our Beautiful Surroundings

My Life so Far

Electric Sheep

My name is Keasey, and I have been stumbling through existence for almost 22 years now. I thoroughly enjoy taking photographs of other weird little human beings, isolating myself from reality, and cats. I also unconditionally love movies and the art of film making. When I am a big boy I want to be a cinematographer more than anything else in the whole wide world, so I have enlisted in the Multimedia Design program to hone my skills and absorb as much knowledge as my squishy brain can handle. I have a very dark sense of humor and my mind has been corrupted by growing up breastfed by American television, so if I offend you I wholeheartedly apologize. I really like smashing things with hammers, eating pistachio ice cream, and secretly eavesdropping on your conversations. One time I accidentally gave a ‘thumbs-up’ to a blind guy on the bus. I don’t play any instruments, but I strongly believe that learning how to play the piano should be a requirement in all elementary schools. One day I want to be that cool uncle who gives his nieces and nephews illegal fireworks and sips of hard alcohol. Mr. Rodgers and Che Guevara are my biggest heroes because they both promoted truth and love, though in very different ways. If we become friends I will share cigarettes with you and make fun of everything you do, but secretly care a whole awful lot about how your day went and what your fears are. Thanks for taking the time to get to know me, and remember that the time you just spent reading this is irretrievable and you are one step closer to your inevitable death. So go ride your bike or something.

By: Keasey Freed