Author Archives: annacksmith

Belles and Chimes Eugene Video

Below is a video I created to highlight the Eugene chapter of Belles and Chimes. It was originally created for my class, Video Production 1, and turned out great. The Eugene chapter of Belles and Chimes is a great way for women to learn about and play pinball. Come visit the team on Tuesday nights at Blairalley Vintage Arcade in Eugene OR to learn more or visit them on social media.

Impromptu Portraits

Since my last posting I’ve gotten myself three jobs and with the addition to school, I just haven’t really had the time to do much of my own stuff. However while helping out with a video shoot the other day I was able to sneak off with one of the actors and take some of these pictures and I thank her and the others I was working with for the time.

Topa Topa Brewing

In this project I was given video and audio clips and asked to create a promotional video. Over the course of the term I learned how to better use Premiere, Audition, and then After Effects to make this video on how the beer is made at Topa Topa. I hope you enjoy.

2018 Scholarship Essays

All Scholarship Essays, 2018

Prompt One: What are your specific educational plans and career goals and why? What inspires you to achieve them? (Words, 163; Characters, 954)

I’ve always liked being around people and talking with them about their passions, what they enjoy, what they are interested in, and giving them a space to explore themselves. In high school, I was part of an outreach program that brought educational activities to local schools. This not only inspired learning, but helped encourage others to think about the future. Helping others learn is something I find rewarding, and to this end I have become an advocate for free and accessible education. My career goal is to be a designer of learning installations in museums. In the spring of 2019, I will graduate with an AA in Multimedia Design and a one-year web design certificate from LCC; from there I want to study science communications and interactive design at UO. I hope to work in a museum here in Oregon designing interactive spaces, like those in OMSI or the Chicago Field Museum, for people of all ages to explore themselves and their universe.

 

Prompt Two: What have you done for your family or community that you care about the most and why? (Words, 157; Characters, 972

Education is important to me, and helping others learn is something I have found rewarding. During high school, I joined my local robotics team with the intent of learning more about science and engineering. Once I joined, I found it was also a great outlet to teach others. I worked with other teams in the area and around the world building robots and facilitating community outreach to get people interested in technology. One of the things I worked on was creating and presenting educational activities for different age groups. I created a set of activities: making basic bridges and vehicles out of household materials to promote technological literacy and discovery. Watching parents and children engage with each other and educational materials clicked for me and made me realize that I want to help others learn and think about what’s possible. Encouraging others to learn basic engineering principles has reinforced my core value that education is for everyone.

 

Prompt Three: Describe a personal accomplishment and the strengths and skills you used to achieve it. (Words, 191; Characters, 993) — (Words, 166; Characters, 823)

It took me a long time to become comfortable with myself. Growing up I had a lot of problems with self-image and self-hate, not so much in the superficial sense, but with my inner-self. Most of this had to do with the way I perceived myself fitting in. I have realized over time that, to have the kind of life I want I needed to start being honest with myself and others about who I am and how I want to fit into the world. Society will never think I look and act the way I should, no matter what I change about myself, so I need to just be frank about who I am.  This kind of honesty takes time, courage, and a lot of work, but I’m glad I started the process. I’ve already accomplished something, self-acceptance, and I continually strive to be the most authentic version of myself. Knowing that I fit into this world has made me a more open person, which has led me to be a more communicative and loyal friend, as well as improved my skills as an activist, writer, and counselor to others.  

It took me a long time to become comfortable with myself. Growing up I had a lot of problems with self-image, not in the superficial sense, but with my inner-self. Most of this had to do with the way I perceived myself fitting in. I have realized over time that, to have the kind of life I want I needed to start being honest with myself about who I am and how I want to fit into the world. Society will never think I look and act the way I should, no matter what I change, so I need to just be frank about who I am. This kind of honesty takes time, courage, and a lot of work, but I’m glad I started the process. Knowing that I fit into this world has made me a more open person, which has led me to be a more communicative and loyal friend, as well as improved my skills as an activist, writer, and counselor to others.  

 

Prompt Four: Describe a significant change or experience that has occurred in your life. How did you respond and what did you learn about yourself? (Words, 190; Characters 999) — (Words, 162; Characters, 836)

The sight of the moon used to make me cry. One year my parents gave me a book called We See the Moon. It directs an adopted child to the moon, telling them that what they see is the same thing their birth parents see and when they look at the moon they’re thinking of the child they lost. I was adopted after being abandoned on a bench, and for a long time I deeply resented my birth parents. The book humanized them in a way that I was unprepared for. I felt its light try to pull me out every night and face my true parents. The moon exposes a defenseless side of me, but has helped me better understand and rationalize the feelings of abandonment, and in turn helped me get over my anxiety. I found that facing my fears and being honest about their source and why I have them led to a greater and more empathetic understanding of myself and others. The moon is still a near-constant reminder that as much as you try to glamorize something, the reality of the situation will always shine through.

The sight of the moon used to make me cry. One year my parents gave me a book called We See the Moon. It directs an adopted child to the moon, telling them that what they see is the same thing their birth parents see and when they see the moon they’re thinking of the child they lost. I was adopted after being abandoned on a bench, and for a long time I deeply resented my birth parents. The book humanized them in a way that I was unprepared for. I felt its light try to pull me out every night and face my true parents. The moon exposes a defenseless side of me, but has helped me understand and rationalize the feelings of abandonment, and in helped me get over my anxiety. I found that facing my fears and being honest about their source and why I have them led to a greater and more empathetic understanding of myself and others.

 

Prompt Five: Tell us about your paid work history. What jobs have you held in the past five years and how many hours did you work at each job? What were your main responsibilities? List any special accomplishments or recognition. (Words, 170)

Public Relations Assistant; Eugene, OR (January-Present) Responsibilities: Creating and maintaining social media content for the LCC Arts Division. This includes taking and editing photos of student work, attending and promoting events, as well as posting interviews and other content to facebook and instagram.

Staff, The Torch; Eugene, OR (Sep. 2017-Present) Responsibilities: Basic journalistic duties working as a part of an award winning news team. This includes setting up and conducting interviews, writing articles, and photojournalism.

Production Assistant, Goodwill; Corvallis, OR (May. 2015-Jun. 2016) Responsibilities: Basic stocking and customer service in and around the store as well as simple pricing duties for housewares department.

Server/Driver, Blue Sky Chinese Restaurant; Corvallis, OR (Oct. 2014-Feb. 2016) Responsibilities: Customer service, basic cash register duties, serving food, basic maintenance, taking in person online and phone orders, and delivery.

OSU Food Science Pilot Plant Worker, Brian Yorgey; Corvallis OR (Jun.-Aug. 2013) Responsibilities: Processing fresh fruit and vegetables for a crop variety study and then conducting basic chemical tests on samples of the various crops.

 

Prompt Six: Besides working and attending classes, what activities are you involved with? Is there a special passion you have for these activities? Summarize time spent on each activity. Highlight leadership roles, special accomplishments or recognition received. (Words, 170)

Getting involved with the following activities mattered to me because I feel that getting involved with community projects will foster a more connected and understanding public, a better overall spirit, and a stronger local community. I genuinely enjoy helping other people and plan to do it for the rest of my life.

Over five years I worked on the Crescent Valley Robotics team. I held the titles of: Business Co-Manager, Media Manager, Public Relations and Outreach Lead, Communications Lead, Events Coordinator, and Active Member. My efforts led to many awards, most notably a regional business award, and the team attending three world championships.

Over 8+ years I volunteered my time to the Pacific Northwest District of the Unitarian Universalist Association. I got involved with many small projects in the community including planning and facilitating events as well as volunteering my time with other nonprofits. Additionally, I sat on a national board and held a seat on a district team, the aim was to get others participating in local social action.

 

Prompt Seven: What does being an Oregonian mean to you? How will your education be used to make an impact in Oregon? Length: 1 page

I love being a part of a community that cares about itself, it’s members, and the surrounding environment. Growing up in a community that values all life and the inherent worth and dignity of everybody has shaped this perspective and for the better part of my life, I have worked to implement these principles around me. For a number of years I was very involved with several social activism communities and had helped people all over the pacific northwest, and to some extent the entire US, get in touch with their neighbors and learn more about community engagement, values I view as Oregonian traits. Doing this mattered to me because I feel that getting others involved will foster a more connected and understanding public, a better overall spirit, and a stronger Oregon.

I have tirelessly been involved with the pursuit of a greater community in the last decade as a dedicated member of many non-profit organizations and as a citizen. This included planning and facilitating both educational and informational speeches and events as well as going out into the community and volunteering my time with other non-profit efforts to improve the lives of Oregonians. I first got involved with social justice and social action work through my church. Getting involved with the church led me to volunteer and help lead a district wide, and then nationwide board. The missions of these groups was to get others interested and participating in social action in local communities in the pacific northwest.

I genuinely enjoy helping other people and plan to do it for the rest of my life. I view my education as a way to give back and serve the Oregon community. When I think about the humanitarian principles I value I see these beliefs and ethics as essential rights all humans should have, no matter who they are and where their place is in life. After graduating, I want to work in museums creating fun and engaging interactive exhibits for people of all ages to learn from. Providing or creating a source of free and accessible education for Oregonians such as OMSI. Eventually, after gaining more experience and working in the non-profit sector, I’d like to start my own non-profit with someone I grew up with. The non-profit we envision would cater to the needs of single and low-income mothers across Oregon for quality low-cost personal prenatal and newborn care. This kind of non-profit doesn’t exist yet in Oregon and it is a gap that needs to be filled, and I want to fill it.

 

Prompt Eight: How has your diversity (cultural heritage/race/gender/socio-economic background/family/work, and/or school experiences etc.) contributed to who you are today and your pursuit of a college education? 

For a long time being diverse was something I didn’t take pride in. I struggled a lot, and still do sometimes, with my own diversity because the people I was surrounded by when I was young weren’t very diverse. I was adopted  from China and raised in a Caucasian family in a mostly white and Asian neighborhood. I didn’t fit in with the other Asian children because I didn’t speak their languages or know their culture, and the Caucasian kids often rejected me because I looked like I belonged with the Asians. Because of this I grew up very isolated and learned from a young age that concealing parts of my identity and assimilation was the only way to escape the pain of rejection and abandonment.

I was first able to better embrace my diverse identity when I started going to a Unitarian Universalist (UU) church. There I found people who celebrated differences and embraced what made themselves unique. Being a part of a community that genuinely cared about itself and its members changed my way of thinking. As I became more familiar with the UU perspective I learned that it wasn’t what made people the same, it was what makes people different that leads to contentment.

With this new outlook I became tirelessly involved with the pursuit of a greater and more accepting community as a dedicated member of many non-profit organizations and as a citizen. In the UU community I volunteered and helped lead a district wide, and then nationwide board that included advocate work for LGBTQ communities. Doing this work opened my eyes to different gender and sexual identities, about which I had been ignorant. As I learned and worked with them I gradually became aware of my own identity as a queer person. It took me time to embrace this aspect of myself and come out, but doing so has allowed me to fully accept myself. Before coming out I felt like I was still hiding parts of myself to the world, but doing so has made me a more honest and authentic person as well as improved the quality of my relationships.

I genuinely enjoy helping other people and plan to do it for the rest of my life. I view my education as preparing me to give back and serve the Oregon community. When I think about the humanitarian principles I value I see these beliefs and ethics as essential rights all humans should have, no matter who they are and where their place is in life. After graduating, I want to work in museums creating fun and engaging interactive exhibits that will help people of all ages appreciate history and culture, as well as gain a better understanding of science and technology. It is important to me that museums be a source of free, accessible, and inclusive education for Oregonians. Eventually, after gaining more experience and working in the non-profit sector, I’d like to start my own non-profit with someone I grew up with. The non-profit we envision would cater to the needs of single and low-income mothers across Oregon for quality low-cost personal prenatal and newborn care. This kind of non-profit doesn’t exist yet in Oregon and it is a gap that needs to be filled, and I want to fill it.

Lighting for Media

These are the projects that served as a final from my Lighting for Media class taken at Lane Community College in the Media Arts Department with Teresa Hughes. The first video was a group project where we were given a scene and asked to come up with lighting and blocking plots and then a final video. The Second video has two parts; a replication of a photo with dynamic lighting recreated in the studio; and a dynamic scene conceptualized and created by me.

 

I went to Canada

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Following is a short video of crappy footage from my trip. I really only filmed two of the days of the trip, and what I did film was rushed and has the shakes. But it’s my first attempt at a video like this.

https://youtu.be/Hct_1wnTfqE 

Music: https://soundcloud.com/clevtmusic

Thanks to Matthew, Meiling, Nate and Eliza, Sara and Avery, and Michael, it was a really fun trip. And thanks Eddy for dragging me along in the first place.


Audio Production

These are the projects I worked on and created for my audio production class taken at Lane Community College in the Media Arts Department with Mel Stark. In both projects I was asked to remove all audio from an original scene and then supplement it with my own. I recorded all my own ADR (10%), foley (60%,) and found a few sounds (30%, in video descriptions) to complete this project.