Category Archives: Training

LaneOnline Best Practices in Course Design (OSCQR) – self-enrollment now open.

Course Description

Have you taught online but could like a refresher on best practices?  Maybe you have never taught online, but are planning to do so in the future?  This course is perfect for you!  The LOBP in Course Design using OSCQR will introduce you to teaching online at Lane and spend time reviewing best practices in online course development and design found within OSCQR (OPEN SUNY Course Quality Review/Rubric).  

This course is designed for new or experienced online instructors who are new to OSCQR or teaching online at LCC. 

General Course Outcomes

  • The participant will be able to identify and design online experiences using best practices in student success.
  • The participant will be able to identify and design engaging courses with designed interaction that is appropriate for the course modality (remote/hybrid or online)
  • The participant will develop an action plan on how they will integrate best practices into their online teaching.

Workshop Syllabus for more detail on LaneOnline Best Practices in Course Design using OSCQR.

LOBP in Course Design using OSCQR self-enrollment is currently open.

Session 5: Content and Activities

June 5, 1pm-2pm Recording.

Does your course offer access to a variety of engaging resources and activities that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement?

OSCQR: Content and Activities Category 

Upcoming options

LaneOnline OSCQR Top 15 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Cvto7EL4oOvqzVZv1HBNKu0FTTN53SB716V9S6u_pmM/edit

OSCQR in focus:

29. [Variety] Course offers access to a variety of engaging resources that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement.

Why it matters:

  • Students learn more by doing than by listening/consuming content.
  • All content and activities should be aligned with module, course, and program objectives.
  • WHY do students need to do this?  Do you tell them why?

What it looks like:

  • Tell them WHY and HOW they should be engaging with course resources.
  • Meet with a librarian to help find more engaging materials.
  • Explore OERCommons
  • Course share with other faculty – meet and show what you do and why. (teaching-pairs?)
  • Don’t lecture.  (50 alternatives to lecturing) – small chunks w/ interaction/assessment.
  • Using the features within zoom to keep students engaged
  • Google doc – reactions while learning – used as prompts for future discussion
  • Breakout rooms in zoom for discussion

30. [Higher Order Thinking] Course provides activities for learners to develop higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills, such as critical reflection and analysis.

Why it matters:

  • Individual and group reflections – sustained critical thinking and reflection allow the students to construct knowledge, inquiring, exploring, and thinking.

What it looks like:

  • Reflection – what did you learn?  Why is it important to you?  How can you apply this today? Etc..
  • Peer review groups – when assigning groups encourage (or assign?) students to meet via Google hangouts as a group.
  • Use anonymous posts in a course forum.  
  • Assign students a role in live zoom sessions (moderator, class spokesperson (filters/proposes all student questions, etc.)
  • Allow students to create course content.

31. [Authentic Activities] The course provides activities that emulate real-world applications of the discipline, such as experiential learning, case studies, and problem-based activities.

Why it matters:

  • These activities engage learners by having them establish what they know and don’t know, work together to come up with real-world solutions, share those solutions, and review possible results.

According to Kolb (1984), experiential learning relies on four elements:

  • Experience;
  • Critical reflection;
  • Abstract conceptualization; and
  • Active experimentation in a new situation.

What it looks like:

  • Explore MERLOT for case studies that you can integrated into your course.
  • Create scenario-based discussion forums for learners to interact in. Establish and assign roles for learners within those scenarios.
  • Use mini-cases as pre-lab work where learners can see what might go wrong before they are actually immersed in an online lab.
  • Have learners create and facilitate course related scenarios.
  • Have learners turn in reflective essays along with applied learning activities to measure critical thinking and reflection stages of the process.
  • Assign “offline” activities to learners, and have the learners “debrief” in the online environment.
  • Require foreign language learners to interact with native speakers (online) and summarize their experiences.
  • Have learners document their real-world experiences through digital storytelling tools.

Step 6, 7, 8 in Remote/Hybrid/Online Course Development

This post is continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course.

Wondering where to start? Just as we normally tell our students – start at the top and work your way down. The development checklist and all other guides on course development are designed to help you chunk the course development into easy to digest chunks. Taking the course development overall process step-by-step will help take a massive project and turn it into doable steps.

Step 6: The course development checklist is designed to walk you through setting up your course – starting with providing directions on how students should start the course (getting started) through the first week or module of the course.

Key points in step 6 are to make sure you have a welcoming introduction, all your essential course information is clear, students and instructor begin to build class community from the very first student entry into the course.

Step 7: Consult with an instructional designer! Once you have completed your getting started material, course orientation, syllabus, introduction materials, and week 1 –> STOP! Meet with an ID to review your work and gather feedback on how to progress with the remainder of your course development.

Step 8: Following your format of week 1 – develop weeks 2, 3, …. Following OSCQR top 15 as a guide.  It’s ok if your course is not 100% complete before week 1, as long as week 1 is ready by week 1!  🙂

Stay tuned – step 9, 10, and 11 are next week!

Session 4: Interaction

Session Recording from May 22

How do we build critical pieces to our online, hybrid, or remote courses? How can my teaching be as effective as I was in the classroom? How can my students feel like they belong to the class and establish a community and trust amongst all participants?

OSCQR [Interaction] best practices in focus during this topic: 

*40. [Instructor Presence] Learners have an opportunity to get to know the instructor.[Syllabus / Instructor Bio, Introductions Forum]

*41.  [Class Community] Course contains resources or activities intended to build a sense of class community, support open communication, and establish trust (i.e. Ice-breaker, Bulletin Board, Meet Your Classmates, Q/A Forum)[News and Announcements, Introductions Forum, Course Q/A forum, Various activities through the course.]

*42. [Learner-to-Learner Interaction] Course offers opportunities for learner to learner interaction and constructive collaboration.

*43. [Learner Contributions] Learners are encouraged to share resources and inject knowledge from diverse sources of information in their course interactions.

Future Friday Sessions:

May 29 Completion Conference (Full)

June 5 Creating Engaging Content and Activities

June 12 Online Assessment

Step 5 [..10 steps to course dev]: Instructional Design Moodle Course Template

This post in continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course

Have you ever thought to yourself any of the following:

  • My course is a mess!
  • I worked so hard on all this content and activities, but my students seem so lost!
  • I am new to online/remote teaching and have no idea how to even start! #IfIhadadollar
  • I wish I had a place to at least start from.
  • I wish our department had a starting point for a shared course experience.

Have students ever asked:

  • How do I get started, navigate, and work through your course?
  • What are we doing this week?
  • I can’t find this weeks work, can you help me?
  • Why do we have to do this? (one of my personal favorites)
  • How do I submit this assignment?
  • When is our midterm? Finals? This week’s assignment?
  • I’m confused about what to do when to do it, and how I’m supposed to submit it to you. Can you help me?

Well, have we got an answer for you! The Instructional Design Services has developed a Moodle course shell template, IDS Template [OSCQR]. $ $ Free of charge and 100% openly licensed to share and share-alike with your friends!

The IDS template will provide you with a solid start to a course (remote or online) design that is student-centric and based on research best practices as outlined in OSCQR. Use all or just a few pieces of the course template – a la carte model of sharing the love.

Act fast to get yours! Email the atc@lanecc.edu and just ask for an import!
DONT WAIT! ACT NOW!

Ok..enough of the cheesy infomercial…my sales career lasted only a couple very miserable weeks in college. If interested all you need to do is email the ATC and ask for an import of all or pieces of the template. Have questions about how to use the template or what parts make sense to bring over to your course? Inquire with an instructional designer.

Review of steps to Course Dev so far covered:
STEP 1: Brush up on my Moodle skills.
STEP 2: Review and spend time with the IDs OSCQR Top 15 best practices in course design.
Step 3: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.
Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).
Step 5: Ask the ATC to import the IDS Moodle course template.  Use the template material and fill in the blanks where needed.

next post in series of 10 steps to course dev (coming soon):
Step 6: Complete Getting Started Course Development checklist and follow the steps on building introduction through week 1 of course.
Step 7: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.

Google doc in action (steps 1-5)

Questions / Comments / Feedback – comment in discussion below!

Friday Session 2: Getting Started, Course Overview, and Information

UPDATE 5/12: Recording of this session available

What are some top student success strategies when starting an online course? We will talk about these and what essential components need to be in place in your course for the greatest chance of student success.

OSCQR best practices in focus during this topic: 

  1. *1. [Getting Started] Course includes Welcome and Course Orientation Content that establishes instructor presence and guidance. 
  2. *2. [Course Overview] An orientation or overview is provided for the course overall, as well as in each module. Learners know how to navigate and what tasks are due.
  3. *40. [Instructor Presence] Learners have an opportunity to get to know the instructor.

Outline and resources

Step 4 [..10 steps to course dev]: Course Planning Worksheet

Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).

This post in continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course

The course planning worksheet has gotten a lot of positive feedback from instructors who have worked with it.  When completed BEFORE you dive into Moodle and start adding all kinds of cool stuff to your course.  The planning worksheet is designed to help you outline or draft your course before you take the time to add / remove / change / move / delete / re-add / pull hair out.  Do this as paper and pencil – or draft through Google docs.  Eventually, you can integrate this into your syllabus to provide a one(ish) page “snap-shot” of your course.

Don’t have 100% of the course figured out yet?  Yeah – me either!  No course will ever be 100% developed – it’s like remodeling a house.  Many first time courses have instructors who do their best to stay one week ahead of the students.  This is okay!  

One of the most difficult parts of teaching online is I can’t just “wing-it” like I used to [only sometimes] in the classroom.  Many of my best lessons were those conceived on the drive into campus.  Or those ad-hoc discussions when the students and I would go down the rabbit hole on a cool concept (actually I have much richer discussions online now).  

That all said, complete the course planning worksheet to the level of detail you feel your pedagogy has tolerance for.  It will help you, trust me.  Share a solid outline of your course with your students to provide a course format, but allow for flexibility and adaptation of your instruction per your student response and interactions with the course…just like in 2019!

Zoom training incoming!

Want to get up to speed (or go from 0 to ready) with Zoom? We’ve got you covered this week:

Zoom Training: 

The ATC will be offering drop-in Zoom Video Conferencing training this week. We encourage any staff or faculty member to attend the session. We will cover simple topics like how to sign in and create meetings, to advanced features like screen sharing and cloud recording. All sessions will be held in the ATC Classroom located in the Center Building, Room 219 from 12-1pm on the following days:

  • Tuesday, March 10th
  • Wednesday, March 11th
  • Thursday, March 12th

Contact the ATC (atc@lanecc.edu) if you have any questions.

LaneOnline Course Development Orientation

New opportunity to learn about how to apply for funding (up to 80 hours) and support for online course development!  You must attend an orientation in order to apply for funding.  If you are not able to make a scheduled orientation please contact us at idservices@lanecc.edu to discuss options.

Current Spring Term Orientations:

Week 7: Friday, May 17 3pm in ATC Classroom (CEN/219)

Week 7 Registration: Please complete (10second) registration so we can anticipate participation.

Week 8: Friday, May 24 1pm in ATC Classroom (CEN/219)

Week 9: TBD

Interested in Teaching Online

Following (from a computer) the OLC Innovate 2019 conference this week – more specifically the tweets from @alexpickett, Director Online Teaching at Open SUNY.  I am happy to have found Open SUNY offering a FREE (openly licensed for you OER buffs) course on Interested in Teaching Online?

“This course is designed to introduce you to teaching online – the concepts, competencies, pedagogies, and practices that are required to plan, develop, and teach an online course. Along with introducing you to these key topics, this course will showcase the perspectives of students, faculty, and instructional designers who have a wide range of experience teaching and learning online.” 

If you are interested in teaching online – or if you have been teaching online and want to widen your understanding of the landscape I highly encourage you to check this course out.  Upon completion, you will earn a badge that you can use to show off your mad online teaching skills to help land more gigs or claim bragging rights!

Want more specific online courses offered through LaneOnline Instructional Design Services visit our list of offerings in Online Instruction training.