Category Archives: Readiness

Zoom is the new classroom

Adorable Guide Dogs Host Zoom Call
Zoom is the new dog park.

If we like it or not, Zoom and other online web conferencing (Google Meet) is here to stay and the “easy” days of normal may never be “normal” again. How do you replicate what we did in the classroom in zoom? A: You can’t.

If you are expecting to fully engage your students with your live lecturing performance you will be sorely disappointed with the level of participation.

Students most likely will have their webcams turned off. They may not have a private space or many other reasons why it is uncomfortable for them to allow you (and ALL their classmates) into their home/car/porch/tent/etc… Because their webcam is turned off, you can not see their face or read their reactions to the discussion.

Why the summer sound of noisy crickets is growing fainter
Crickets chirp when it’s silent.

Have you tried asking an open question in zoom only to be answered with silence [insert crickets chirping]? Students may not be paying attention or know how to interact in this new classroom. Building class-community and connections with students from the start may help easy their tensions when trying to interact with their instructor and classmates. Give students a chance to use Zoom reactions vs verbal responses. Then WAIT…until ALL students have responded in some way.

You may have also heard about Zoom fatigue. Imagine a student who has 3 lectures on zoom in one day. Now imagine having three 1-hour to 1.5-hour long meetings in one day via Zoom. YUCK is right! Only ask participants to turn on webcams if it is absolutely needed.

So how do we teach inside of Zoom?
I fall on the side of using Zoom to support the content, rather than deliver the content. Zoom makes it really easy for us to create, edit, and link in Moodle a screencast of our content. We use Zoom to screencast our content into micro-lectures, then use our live class sessions in Zoom to discuss, reinforce, and expand upon concepts. Sounds like a new type of flipped-classroom!

There are hundreds of tips and tricks to use while teaching in Zoom. The best advice we can give is to practice – practice – practice. All of the reactions, filters, polls, screen-shares, etc are only great if you know how to use them and seamlessly transition from one to another. We can help you get started in the ATC!

Need to talk through your course plan with an Instructional Designer?

Post UPDATE: Learn Zoom through LCCs Linked-in Learning platform.

Step 5 [..10 steps to course dev]: Instructional Design Moodle Course Template

This post in continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course

Have you ever thought to yourself any of the following:

  • My course is a mess!
  • I worked so hard on all this content and activities, but my students seem so lost!
  • I am new to online/remote teaching and have no idea how to even start! #IfIhadadollar
  • I wish I had a place to at least start from.
  • I wish our department had a starting point for a shared course experience.

Have students ever asked:

  • How do I get started, navigate, and work through your course?
  • What are we doing this week?
  • I can’t find this weeks work, can you help me?
  • Why do we have to do this? (one of my personal favorites)
  • How do I submit this assignment?
  • When is our midterm? Finals? This week’s assignment?
  • I’m confused about what to do when to do it, and how I’m supposed to submit it to you. Can you help me?

Well, have we got an answer for you! The Instructional Design Services has developed a Moodle course shell template, IDS Template [OSCQR]. $ $ Free of charge and 100% openly licensed to share and share-alike with your friends!

The IDS template will provide you with a solid start to a course (remote or online) design that is student-centric and based on research best practices as outlined in OSCQR. Use all or just a few pieces of the course template – a la carte model of sharing the love.

Act fast to get yours! Email the atc@lanecc.edu and just ask for an import!
DONT WAIT! ACT NOW!

Ok..enough of the cheesy infomercial…my sales career lasted only a couple very miserable weeks in college. If interested all you need to do is email the ATC and ask for an import of all or pieces of the template. Have questions about how to use the template or what parts make sense to bring over to your course? Inquire with an instructional designer.

Review of steps to Course Dev so far covered:
STEP 1: Brush up on my Moodle skills.
STEP 2: Review and spend time with the IDs OSCQR Top 15 best practices in course design.
Step 3: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.
Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).
Step 5: Ask the ATC to import the IDS Moodle course template.  Use the template material and fill in the blanks where needed.

next post in series of 10 steps to course dev (coming soon):
Step 6: Complete Getting Started Course Development checklist and follow the steps on building introduction through week 1 of course.
Step 7: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.

Google doc in action (steps 1-5)

Questions / Comments / Feedback – comment in discussion below!

Get Ready for Online Readiness!

Online Student Readiness is a passion project of mine. (Others have hobbies, I hear). There are dozens of factors that have an impact on whether a student can succeed in an online course in any given term, and only a few of these are within the control of the college. One of these is whether we’re setting students up for success in online by providing training in the skills that the online medium requires.

The short summary:

Starting in Winter 2019, faculty can add our Readiness survey or any one of six individual modules to their classes, refer students to a Moodle “course” that takes an hour and will help prepare students for online, or refer students (through Week 2) to a credit-level Effective Online Learning course to help them succeed in online. This post covers the surveys and modules.

Here are links to all of these resources:

The background:

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