Session 5: Content and Activities

June 5, 1pm-2pm Recording.

Does your course offer access to a variety of engaging resources and activities that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement?

OSCQR: Content and Activities Category 

Upcoming options

LaneOnline OSCQR Top 15 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Cvto7EL4oOvqzVZv1HBNKu0FTTN53SB716V9S6u_pmM/edit

OSCQR in focus:

29. [Variety] Course offers access to a variety of engaging resources that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement.

Why it matters:

  • Students learn more by doing than by listening/consuming content.
  • All content and activities should be aligned with module, course, and program objectives.
  • WHY do students need to do this?  Do you tell them why?

What it looks like:

  • Tell them WHY and HOW they should be engaging with course resources.
  • Meet with a librarian to help find more engaging materials.
  • Explore OERCommons
  • Course share with other faculty – meet and show what you do and why. (teaching-pairs?)
  • Don’t lecture.  (50 alternatives to lecturing) – small chunks w/ interaction/assessment.
  • Using the features within zoom to keep students engaged
  • Google doc – reactions while learning – used as prompts for future discussion
  • Breakout rooms in zoom for discussion

30. [Higher Order Thinking] Course provides activities for learners to develop higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills, such as critical reflection and analysis.

Why it matters:

  • Individual and group reflections – sustained critical thinking and reflection allow the students to construct knowledge, inquiring, exploring, and thinking.

What it looks like:

  • Reflection – what did you learn?  Why is it important to you?  How can you apply this today? Etc..
  • Peer review groups – when assigning groups encourage (or assign?) students to meet via Google hangouts as a group.
  • Use anonymous posts in a course forum.  
  • Assign students a role in live zoom sessions (moderator, class spokesperson (filters/proposes all student questions, etc.)
  • Allow students to create course content.

31. [Authentic Activities] The course provides activities that emulate real-world applications of the discipline, such as experiential learning, case studies, and problem-based activities.

Why it matters:

  • These activities engage learners by having them establish what they know and don’t know, work together to come up with real-world solutions, share those solutions, and review possible results.

According to Kolb (1984), experiential learning relies on four elements:

  • Experience;
  • Critical reflection;
  • Abstract conceptualization; and
  • Active experimentation in a new situation.

What it looks like:

  • Explore MERLOT for case studies that you can integrated into your course.
  • Create scenario-based discussion forums for learners to interact in. Establish and assign roles for learners within those scenarios.
  • Use mini-cases as pre-lab work where learners can see what might go wrong before they are actually immersed in an online lab.
  • Have learners create and facilitate course related scenarios.
  • Have learners turn in reflective essays along with applied learning activities to measure critical thinking and reflection stages of the process.
  • Assign “offline” activities to learners, and have the learners “debrief” in the online environment.
  • Require foreign language learners to interact with native speakers (online) and summarize their experiences.
  • Have learners document their real-world experiences through digital storytelling tools.

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