Monthly Archives: June 2020

LaneOnline Best Practices in Course Design (OSCQR) – self-enrollment now open.

Course Description

Have you taught online but could like a refresher on best practices?  Maybe you have never taught online, but are planning to do so in the future?  This course is perfect for you!  The LOBP in Course Design using OSCQR will introduce you to teaching online at Lane and spend time reviewing best practices in online course development and design found within OSCQR (OPEN SUNY Course Quality Review/Rubric).  

This course is designed for new or experienced online instructors who are new to OSCQR or teaching online at LCC. 

General Course Outcomes

  • The participant will be able to identify and design online experiences using best practices in student success.
  • The participant will be able to identify and design engaging courses with designed interaction that is appropriate for the course modality (remote/hybrid or online)
  • The participant will develop an action plan on how they will integrate best practices into their online teaching.

Workshop Syllabus for more detail on LaneOnline Best Practices in Course Design using OSCQR.

LOBP in Course Design using OSCQR self-enrollment is currently open.

Session 5: Content and Activities

June 5, 1pm-2pm Recording.

Does your course offer access to a variety of engaging resources and activities that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement?

OSCQR: Content and Activities Category 

Upcoming options

LaneOnline OSCQR Top 15 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Cvto7EL4oOvqzVZv1HBNKu0FTTN53SB716V9S6u_pmM/edit

OSCQR in focus:

29. [Variety] Course offers access to a variety of engaging resources that facilitate communication and collaboration, deliver content, and support learning and engagement.

Why it matters:

  • Students learn more by doing than by listening/consuming content.
  • All content and activities should be aligned with module, course, and program objectives.
  • WHY do students need to do this?  Do you tell them why?

What it looks like:

  • Tell them WHY and HOW they should be engaging with course resources.
  • Meet with a librarian to help find more engaging materials.
  • Explore OERCommons
  • Course share with other faculty – meet and show what you do and why. (teaching-pairs?)
  • Don’t lecture.  (50 alternatives to lecturing) – small chunks w/ interaction/assessment.
  • Using the features within zoom to keep students engaged
  • Google doc – reactions while learning – used as prompts for future discussion
  • Breakout rooms in zoom for discussion

30. [Higher Order Thinking] Course provides activities for learners to develop higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills, such as critical reflection and analysis.

Why it matters:

  • Individual and group reflections – sustained critical thinking and reflection allow the students to construct knowledge, inquiring, exploring, and thinking.

What it looks like:

  • Reflection – what did you learn?  Why is it important to you?  How can you apply this today? Etc..
  • Peer review groups – when assigning groups encourage (or assign?) students to meet via Google hangouts as a group.
  • Use anonymous posts in a course forum.  
  • Assign students a role in live zoom sessions (moderator, class spokesperson (filters/proposes all student questions, etc.)
  • Allow students to create course content.

31. [Authentic Activities] The course provides activities that emulate real-world applications of the discipline, such as experiential learning, case studies, and problem-based activities.

Why it matters:

  • These activities engage learners by having them establish what they know and don’t know, work together to come up with real-world solutions, share those solutions, and review possible results.

According to Kolb (1984), experiential learning relies on four elements:

  • Experience;
  • Critical reflection;
  • Abstract conceptualization; and
  • Active experimentation in a new situation.

What it looks like:

  • Explore MERLOT for case studies that you can integrated into your course.
  • Create scenario-based discussion forums for learners to interact in. Establish and assign roles for learners within those scenarios.
  • Use mini-cases as pre-lab work where learners can see what might go wrong before they are actually immersed in an online lab.
  • Have learners create and facilitate course related scenarios.
  • Have learners turn in reflective essays along with applied learning activities to measure critical thinking and reflection stages of the process.
  • Assign “offline” activities to learners, and have the learners “debrief” in the online environment.
  • Require foreign language learners to interact with native speakers (online) and summarize their experiences.
  • Have learners document their real-world experiences through digital storytelling tools.