Monthly Archives: May 2020

Step 6, 7, 8 in Remote/Hybrid/Online Course Development

This post is continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course.

Wondering where to start? Just as we normally tell our students – start at the top and work your way down. The development checklist and all other guides on course development are designed to help you chunk the course development into easy to digest chunks. Taking the course development overall process step-by-step will help take a massive project and turn it into doable steps.

Step 6: The course development checklist is designed to walk you through setting up your course – starting with providing directions on how students should start the course (getting started) through the first week or module of the course.

Key points in step 6 are to make sure you have a welcoming introduction, all your essential course information is clear, students and instructor begin to build class community from the very first student entry into the course.

Step 7: Consult with an instructional designer! Once you have completed your getting started material, course orientation, syllabus, introduction materials, and week 1 –> STOP! Meet with an ID to review your work and gather feedback on how to progress with the remainder of your course development.

Step 8: Following your format of week 1 – develop weeks 2, 3, …. Following OSCQR top 15 as a guide.  It’s ok if your course is not 100% complete before week 1, as long as week 1 is ready by week 1!  🙂

Stay tuned – step 9, 10, and 11 are next week!

Session 4: Interaction

Session Recording from May 22

How do we build critical pieces to our online, hybrid, or remote courses? How can my teaching be as effective as I was in the classroom? How can my students feel like they belong to the class and establish a community and trust amongst all participants?

OSCQR [Interaction] best practices in focus during this topic: 

*40. [Instructor Presence] Learners have an opportunity to get to know the instructor.[Syllabus / Instructor Bio, Introductions Forum]

*41.  [Class Community] Course contains resources or activities intended to build a sense of class community, support open communication, and establish trust (i.e. Ice-breaker, Bulletin Board, Meet Your Classmates, Q/A Forum)[News and Announcements, Introductions Forum, Course Q/A forum, Various activities through the course.]

*42. [Learner-to-Learner Interaction] Course offers opportunities for learner to learner interaction and constructive collaboration.

*43. [Learner Contributions] Learners are encouraged to share resources and inject knowledge from diverse sources of information in their course interactions.

Future Friday Sessions:

May 29 Completion Conference (Full)

June 5 Creating Engaging Content and Activities

June 12 Online Assessment

Friday Discussions, Session 3: Course Design and Layout

We had a great Friday Discussion last week that centered on course design and layout. 40+ people were in attendance! Up for discussion–One of the regular themes in online student feedback is that consistent course design across online courses is essential to their success. 

We jumped right into the thick of things and took at look at the ID Services OSCQR course templates in action. Several instructors so kindly shared their courses with us and we were able to address the following questions:

  • Is the course design intuitive and easy to navigate?  
  • Is the course cluttered with a lot of various files and links?  
  • Are the instructions on what the student is to do clear?  
  • Do all the links in the course work and provide for easy navigation back to the course? 

As promised, here is the link to the Session 3 presentation
Note: We cannot provide links to the courses that were used in the demo.

Other resource links from the presentation:

Be sure to join us this Friday, May 22, 1-2pm, for Session 4: Building Interaction in Your Course. You can also join us for our Instructional Design OPEN Office Hour. Join the Zoom Meeting https://lanecc.zoom.us/j/93310264545

Step 5 [..10 steps to course dev]: Instructional Design Moodle Course Template

This post in continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course

Have you ever thought to yourself any of the following:

  • My course is a mess!
  • I worked so hard on all this content and activities, but my students seem so lost!
  • I am new to online/remote teaching and have no idea how to even start! #IfIhadadollar
  • I wish I had a place to at least start from.
  • I wish our department had a starting point for a shared course experience.

Have students ever asked:

  • How do I get started, navigate, and work through your course?
  • What are we doing this week?
  • I can’t find this weeks work, can you help me?
  • Why do we have to do this? (one of my personal favorites)
  • How do I submit this assignment?
  • When is our midterm? Finals? This week’s assignment?
  • I’m confused about what to do when to do it, and how I’m supposed to submit it to you. Can you help me?

Well, have we got an answer for you! The Instructional Design Services has developed a Moodle course shell template, IDS Template [OSCQR]. $ $ Free of charge and 100% openly licensed to share and share-alike with your friends!

The IDS template will provide you with a solid start to a course (remote or online) design that is student-centric and based on research best practices as outlined in OSCQR. Use all or just a few pieces of the course template – a la carte model of sharing the love.

Act fast to get yours! Email the atc@lanecc.edu and just ask for an import!
DONT WAIT! ACT NOW!

Ok..enough of the cheesy infomercial…my sales career lasted only a couple very miserable weeks in college. If interested all you need to do is email the ATC and ask for an import of all or pieces of the template. Have questions about how to use the template or what parts make sense to bring over to your course? Inquire with an instructional designer.

Review of steps to Course Dev so far covered:
STEP 1: Brush up on my Moodle skills.
STEP 2: Review and spend time with the IDs OSCQR Top 15 best practices in course design.
Step 3: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.
Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).
Step 5: Ask the ATC to import the IDS Moodle course template.  Use the template material and fill in the blanks where needed.

next post in series of 10 steps to course dev (coming soon):
Step 6: Complete Getting Started Course Development checklist and follow the steps on building introduction through week 1 of course.
Step 7: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.

Google doc in action (steps 1-5)

Questions / Comments / Feedback – comment in discussion below!

Friday Session 2: Getting Started, Course Overview, and Information

UPDATE 5/12: Recording of this session available

What are some top student success strategies when starting an online course? We will talk about these and what essential components need to be in place in your course for the greatest chance of student success.

OSCQR best practices in focus during this topic: 

  1. *1. [Getting Started] Course includes Welcome and Course Orientation Content that establishes instructor presence and guidance. 
  2. *2. [Course Overview] An orientation or overview is provided for the course overall, as well as in each module. Learners know how to navigate and what tasks are due.
  3. *40. [Instructor Presence] Learners have an opportunity to get to know the instructor.

Outline and resources

Step 4 [..10 steps to course dev]: Course Planning Worksheet

Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).

This post in continuation of the original 10 Steps to Build a Remote/Hybrid/Online Course

The course planning worksheet has gotten a lot of positive feedback from instructors who have worked with it.  When completed BEFORE you dive into Moodle and start adding all kinds of cool stuff to your course.  The planning worksheet is designed to help you outline or draft your course before you take the time to add / remove / change / move / delete / re-add / pull hair out.  Do this as paper and pencil – or draft through Google docs.  Eventually, you can integrate this into your syllabus to provide a one(ish) page “snap-shot” of your course.

Don’t have 100% of the course figured out yet?  Yeah – me either!  No course will ever be 100% developed – it’s like remodeling a house.  Many first time courses have instructors who do their best to stay one week ahead of the students.  This is okay!  

One of the most difficult parts of teaching online is I can’t just “wing-it” like I used to [only sometimes] in the classroom.  Many of my best lessons were those conceived on the drive into campus.  Or those ad-hoc discussions when the students and I would go down the rabbit hole on a cool concept (actually I have much richer discussions online now).  

That all said, complete the course planning worksheet to the level of detail you feel your pedagogy has tolerance for.  It will help you, trust me.  Share a solid outline of your course with your students to provide a course format, but allow for flexibility and adaptation of your instruction per your student response and interactions with the course…just like in 2019!

10 [way-to-simple] steps to course development

I really like simple lists.  Maybe a way oversimplified list with links for additional details if I would like to venture down that path and learn more.  I don’t have to click all the links – just the ones I want.  I have not found much in the “simple” category lately, so I guess we try and build our own!  You may not be developing an online course, however, you are developing online components of your course regardless of modality.  

What’s the difference between a remote, hybrid, and online course?  IMHO: Interaction.

Best practices in teaching don’t change based on modality – they are still the same.  How you achieve them might differ based on modality.  With this in mind when you review online course design best practices, read them with a lens for your modality.  Do the recommendations make sense for your course?  Not sure – let us help you decide.


Remote/Hybrid/Online Course Development in 10 steps:

STEP 1: Brush up on my Moodle skills.
STEP 2: Review and spend time with the IDs OSCQR Top 15 best practices in course design.
Step 3: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.
Step 4: Complete a course planning worksheet (note this can be used in your syllabus).
Step 5: Ask the ATC to import the IDS Moodle course template.  Use the template material and fill in the blanks where needed.
Step 6: Complete Getting Started Course Development checklist and follow the steps on building introduction through week 1 of course.
Step 7: Meet with an instructional designer to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) on course design and training needed to teach.
Step 8: Following your format of week 1 – develop weeks 2, 3, …. Following OSCQR top 15 as a guide.  It’s ok if your course is not 100% complete before week 1, as long as week 1 is ready by week 1!  🙂
Step 9: Meet with an instructional designer to seek feedback and assistance.
Step10.  Ask students for feedback in course design (maybe weeks 2, 5, & 9)

“How-to” do steps 1-10 [in a Google doc] – current how-to steps 1-3.  4+ coming soon


Step 11 (after the dust settles): Improve! 

What do you think?  Interact with us in the comment options below!