Tag Archives: Katie Morrison-Graham

Sharing Lane’s Work on Honors Assessment

This week I head to Chicago for the National Collegiate Honors Council Conference. It’s the NCHC’s 50th anniversary celebration.

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I’ll be co-presenting at the session, “Approaches to Assessment at Two-Year Colleges,” with Sheila Stepp from Orange County Community College (SUNY).

My presentation focuses on three types of assessment: student learning of course outcomes, student learning of Lane’s Core Learning Outcomes, and program review. I’ll draw on honors assessment work I’ve done with my colleagues: Sarah Lushia, Katie Morrison-Graham, and Eileen Thompson.

Some of my presentation will focus on Lane’s Core Learning Outcomes. Watch the student video produced by Sarah Lushia to see the impact the CLOs have on students.

Some of it will address the use of ePortfolios in assessing student learning. Again, watch the video Sarah produced featuring students discussing the value of ePortfolios. Students and faculty together can engage in authentic assessment of student learning.

The final part of my presentation will concern program review. I’ll draw on the NCHC’s recent development of a program review process, the parallel development of Lane’s program review process, and the Honors Program’s adaptations of both of these processes to best determine our strengths, the areas where we need improvement, and the support we’ll need to make those improvements.

More posts to come during and/or after the conference!

 

 

And Then There Were Two: The New Configuration of the Honors Program’s Administration

We are in the fifth year of the honors program, and after several iterations of honors administrative leadership, the college has settled on a tentatively permanent structure: a dean and a faculty coordinator. This may not sound like a significant decision, but we have built this program with an ever-changing team. It is exciting and anxiety-producing to think we have some stability now even with fewer people working on the program.

We began with two faculty coordinators (Nadia Raza and me), each working on the program part time. Then Nadia stepped down and Katie Morrison-Graham came on board, although for a time the three of us were working on honors together.

Nadia, Katie, and me working with then Vice President, Sonya Christian.

Nadia, Katie, and me working with then Vice President, Sonya Christian.

Then we switched to one coordinator. Even though I was the only coordinator, I was still working on the program part time. We originally had an administrative support person, as well, who also handled advising and marketing. Then we lost that position and replaced it with a new administrative support position minus the advising component and some of the hours. We had no academic dean initially, although we have had one for the past few years. So many starts and stops. So many changes. There were moments when I felt like our program resembled the blackberry bushes I saw while hiking at Mount Pisgah yesterday in this unusually warm November: clusters of dried berries with a few new red and black berries mixed in.

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What season are we in again? Are we winding down, starting up, or carrying on?

Fortunately, we’ve had a leadership team comprised of intelligent, motivated, thoughtful people who have helped support what we called “the core team.” I know the leadership team will continue helping honors to thrive. Our “core team” is now comprised of me and my dean, Susan Carkin. Susan has been on the Honors Leadership Team from the program’s inception and attended the National Collegiate Honors Council conference with me.

Susan Carkin

Susan Carkin

The Language, Literature, and Communication Division’s Lead Administrative Coordinator, Linda Schantol, has generously taken on some of the administrative support that had been provided elsewhere.

Linda Schantol

Linda Schantol

Having a permanent faculty coordinator position with 75% of its workload dedicated to directing the program, and having the coordinator work one-on-one with the academic dean, will provide the stability and continuity the program needs. It’s a sign that the college is committed to serving all of our students.

Thinking this morning about the program’s history and this new opportunity to dedicate so much of my focus to coordinating this program, I found myself recalling Jorie Graham digging her hands into the absolute (“The Visible World”). The seeds are planted.

Seminar Students Visit UO’s Special Collections Library

This week, Katie Morrison-Graham and I visited the University of Oregon’s Special Collections Library with the students currently taking the Honors Invitation to Inquiry seminar. We are always looking for ways to enhance the seminar’s focus on interdisciplinary research and on thinking critically about the research process. An introduction to archival research proved to be a great addition to the course.

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Manuscripts Librarian, Linda Long, brought out several items from the Gertrude Bass Warner Collection including Japanese lantern slides and Warner’s travel diaries.

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I’ve worked with this collection in the past and it was a nice surprise when she emailed to say these were the materials she would be using. I enjoyed the chance to see the materials again and to share them with my students.

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Linda explained the purpose of a special collections library, described some of the collections in this library’s holdings, and encouraged the students to feel welcome there and use the library as a resource. I was especially appreciative of this invitation because the campus and its libraries can seem overwhelming to someone unfamiliar with them. The honors students now know they have access to excellent scholarly resources and can feel comfortable and confident about using them.

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When we left, one student was already registering so that she could use the library in the future. Others gathered outside to talk over their experience. Linda and I decided based on the students’ response that we will make the Special Collections Library visit a regular part of the honors seminars each year.

Collaboratively-Created, Task-Specific Rubrics

This week, the latest issue of JNCHC arrived in the mail. It included my essay, “Collaborative Design: Building Task-Specific Rubrics in the Honors Classroom,” which is part of the issue’s forum, “Rubrics, Templates, and Outcomes Assessment.” In the essay, I focus on how students in the honors seminars help create the task-specific rubrics we use for different assignments and argue that this activity enhances learning and empowers students.

I did not come to this approach in isolation. Sarah Ulerick and I engaged students in creating rubrics during the first Invitation to Inquiry Seminar in the spring of 2012. My participation in a Faculty Interest Group on critical thinking, led by Siskanna Naynaha and Kate Sullivan, introduced me to an invaluable resource that I used to further develop this approach: Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom, by John C. Bean.

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My co-instructor in the honors seminars, Katie Morrison-Graham, and I continue to refine our approach to developing rubrics with our students. We are planning to work with Lane’s Assessment Team this year to develop more ways to incorporate Lane’s Core Learning Outcomes into our collaboratively-produced, task-specific rubrics.

 

 

Student Member on Honors Leadership Team

The Honors Leadership Team (HLT) finalized its charter last year, and the charter states that we would add one or two student members to the team by fall 2013. While everyone on the team supported this addition, the addition itself proved to be slightly difficult. We began the academic year without a current student on the team, so I am very appreciative of the synchronous events that led to our adding our first student member at the start of winter term 2014.

Cheyne Dandurand took the honors Invitation to Inquiry seminar last year, and he approached me about being a peer mentor in the class this year. He said that he had a positive experience in the class and felt that he could both contribute to this year’s seminar and also gain something himself by participating again.

I team-teach this seminar with my colleague, Katie Morrison-Graham. Katie and I both thought that having Cheyne join the class as a peer mentor was an excellent idea. We also encouraged him to talk to Tamara Pinkas. Tamara is the Cooperative Education Coordinator for Lane’s Advanced Technology and Language, Literature and Communications Divisions. She also oversees the honors experiential learning requirement and teaches the honors cooperative education class. Katie and I recognized that being a peer mentor would be a good form of experiential learning, and we thought that Cheyne could get co-op credit for his work.

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Tamara, however, saw the larger picture and recommended that Cheyne have his co-op work involve the entire Honors Program rather than just one honors class. She suggested that he join the leadership team and come up with other ways to both learn more about the program and contribute to it.

Cheyne decided that he would not only join the HLT and be a peer mentor in the Inquiry seminar. He would also assist with our social media, organize social events for the honors students, and help plan other honors events.

Last week, Cheyne attended the first HLT meeting of the term. We still need to determine the best way to find student members in the future. Fortunately, HLT member and math instructor Jessica Knoch, is working on a process for the team to consider, and I’m confident that we’ll have a plan in place soon. In the meantime, we now have a current student’s perspective informing our discussions, plans, and projects – a perspective that is very much valued by those of us working on the Lane Honors Program.

 

ePortfolios

When we started the Lane Honors Program, then Vice President Sonya Christian had the program pilot student ePortfolios before ePortfolios were rolled out across the college. Each honors student is required to build and continue working with an ePortfolio while in the program. The ePortfolios were intended to showcase the students’ work, thereby acting as additional tiers to their transcripts and resumes; however, we also found other benefits. Several colleagues across campus who had already been researching ePortfolios formed a think tank, and we began to see that ePortfolios had a lot to offer pedagogically.

To augment the think tank’s work, Anne McGrail, Katie Morrison-Graham, Eileen Thompson, and I applied for, and received, Research and Development funds. We also asked Sarah Lushia and Eileen Thompson to be the leads on ePortfolios. They are each building their own portfolios and are teaching students in their honors WR 121_H and WR 122_H classes how to build portfolios, as well. We used the R & D funds to send Sarah and Eileen to the AAEEBL conference in Boston. They returned with a wealth of evidence that ePortfolios are an effective pedagogical tool that is especially useful for teaching critical thinking, one of Lane’s Core Learning Outcomes (CLOs):

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Sarah and Eileen also explained that best practice for using ePortfolios in the classroom is for faculty to build and use ePortfolios themselves. I admit I came to this idea somewhat reluctantly if only because I couldn’t imagine finding the time to work on an ePortfolio. With technological assistance from Kevin Steeves and Jen Klaudinyi, however, I did begin building an ePortfolio:

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I found that it was useful for me to think through the ways my various interests and projects intersect. I have also been teaching students in the honors seminars to build portfolios and to use them for critical thinking. This winter will be the first time that I’ll use my own portfolio as part of the instruction in the honors seminars. I’ll be writing about that experience and about the Honors Program’s work to encourage honors faculty to incorporate ePortfolios into their teaching in future posts. In the meantime, I’m including the link to my ePortfolio. It is filled with empty pages and pages with little or no reflection, and while I realize that this is not the recommended way to share one’s portfolio, I’m willing to take the risk. It’s my hope that my learning curves for building an ePortfolio, teaching using ePortfolios, and helping administer a program that requires ePortfolios will progress along parallel paths and reflect related moments of learning best made visible by sharing the entire process.

NCHC Conference 2013

Katie Morrison-Graham and I are heading out this morning for the National Collegiate Honors Council’s annual conference. For the next few days, I’ll be immersed in discussions about honors education, including participating on a panel focused on honors seminars at two-year colleges and meetings with the Assessment & Evaluation and Two-Year College committees. I’ll post more on these events during the week, but in the meantime I invite questions or areas of interest I can report back on after the conference.

Honors Seminars

On Wednesday, 10/16/13, the Curriculum Committee approved the HON 202_H prefix for the Honors Capstone Seminar. Last year, they approved the HON 201_H prefix for the Invitation to Inquiry Seminar. This two-class sequence is a requirement for students in our program, and, after running variations on the seminars as IDS experimental classes for two years, I feel we’ve landed on the best approach for our college. My co-faculty coordinator Katie Morrison-Graham and I are also working on a conference presentation and contributions to a monograph chapter on two-year college honors seminars for the NCHC this fall. Honors seminars have definitely been on my mind.

The panel and chapter will include contributions from honors faculty at other schools so that we can present a wide range of options for building seminars. There are so many different approaches to seminars depending on the needs of a college or program as well as on the resources available. Schools offer seminars for varying amounts of credit. Some offer non-credit seminars. Others, like Lane, offer them for four credits. Some schools require that students be in the program to take the seminars, while others open them to students across campus. Formats differ greatly and can range from one-hour presentations/discussions by faculty from different disciplines to classes requiring extensive reading and research.

Lane’s seminar sequence is research-based. The first class, Invitation to Inquiry, takes an interdisciplinary look at the academic research process and focuses on thinking critically about this process. What assumptions do we make about scholarly research? If we test these assumptions by engaging in research, do they hold up? What assumptions might have been made in the past but are now being reexamined? This question arises when my colleague and former co-faculty coordinator, Nadia Raza, guest lectures on the implication of academic research in the history of Western Imperialism which always leads to some impressive and difficult discussion by the students. Students also participate in academic events. For instance, they attended a conference on the death penalty at the University of Oregon’s law school and UNESCO Chair at the University of Oregon, Steven Shankman (below), also guest lectured in the seminar about the conference and his work with the Inside Out Program.

Steve Shankman

Our second seminar, Honors Capstone Seminar, is a modified version of the seminar created by Dean of Science, Sarah Ulerick. It builds on the skills developed in the Inquiry seminar. The students decide on group research projects. They then conduct this research over the term and present their findings at a public symposium. As they become clearer about their audience, they also determine the best way to present these findings. They symposium has included guest panels, student paper presentations, keynote speakers, posters, and PowerPoint presentations.  Honors student, Mary Gross (below), presents findings from her group’s research and statistically significant survey on health care needs and services for two-year college students.

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