Category Archives: University of Oregon

Undergraduate Research Field Trips

In my last posts, I noted the college’s plans to eliminate the Honors Program. Although the Board of Education has not officially voted on the final budget, it will do so at tomorrow’s Board meeting. When I know what next year’s version of honors will look like as students complete the program, I will add a post with that information. In the meantime, I want to focus on what the Honors Program has been about for seven years: building scholars and providing opportunities for undergraduate research.

In the Invitation to Inquiry Seminar held each winter, the students visit the University of Oregon’s Special Collections Library. There are previous posts describing this event and sharing photos on this blog.

In the Capstone Seminar held each spring, the students visit the University of Oregon’s (UO) Undergraduate Research Symposium, the Lane Community College Poster Day, and Oregon State University’s (OSU) Honors Thesis Fair. They also put on their own Honors Spring Symposium (I’ll blog about this soon as the symposium is tomorrow!).

There are several benefits to attending the UO’s Undergraduate Research Symposium. These benefits include becoming more familiar with, and comfortable on, the UO campus; seeing examples of research posters; reading a range of abstracts in the symposium program; and attending panel presentations. All of these benefits allow the students to see their research in context of other student research, to build confidence, and to take what they learn from the symposium and apply it to their own projects and assignments in the seminar. In short, this field trip supports the college’s Core Learning Outcome: Apply Learning.

Visiting the college’s own poster day builds on the UO visit by showing students the research projects other students at our college are engaged in and the quality of their posters. This event is organized by honors science faculty, Stacey Kiser, who also team-teaches the two honors seminars with me. Viewing the posters and talking with fellow students helps the seminar students see their work in the context of fellow Lane students.

Lane Poster Day

Another example of a Lane science poster.

Finally, the trip to the OSU provides examples of the research and educational experiences of other honors students. We have an information session at the OSU Honors College where the students learn about the requirements for transfer students and see the honors lounge, workroom, and classrooms. 

OSU Honors College Info Session

We also review the abstracts for the honors posters, walk through the poster session, and talk with students about their work.

Students viewing OSU research posters.

This trip provides a context for honors research, presents sample abstracts and posters that the students can consider when creating their own, and helps make them more comfortable on the OSU campus. It was gratifying to hear students talking about applying to the OSU Honors College after our visit!

Having seen the presentations, poster, and pamphlet the students will share at the Honors Spring Symposium tomorrow, I know the value of these field trips and the impact they have on the students’ own research and on their sense of themselves as scholars moving forward into their academic careers.

 

Honors Students and the UO Special Collections Library

Every winter, the students in the Invitation to Inquiry Seminar visit the University of Oregon’s Special Collections Library. Manuscripts Librarian, Linda Long, teaches an instructive and engaging class on archival research, introducing students to the concepts of scholarly archives, special collections, finding aids, etc.

Examining Japanese lantern slides from the Gertrude Bass Warner Collection.

The Special Collections Library Reading Room

The last part of the class is open for the students to walk around the room examining the various rare books and manuscripts that Linda has brought out for them to see.

Original manuscript for Ken Kesey’s novel, Sometimes a Great Notion.

A signed first edition of Sometimes a Great Notion is currently valued at $2000.

This class session is one of my favorites each year because it is such a pivotal moment for the students. For instance, most students have not been to the University of Oregon’s campus before. Although many of them will transfer to UO, at this point the campus is a large, unfamiliar, and confusing space.

University of Oregon

After the special collections class, students have a point of reference on the campus. They also begin to realize that the library resources at UO are available to them now and they are welcome to use them at any time.

A second moment of awareness that occurs on this trip is just how extensive academic research can be, how many sources of information are out there, and that there is no end to what can be researched. Viewing 13th and 14th century manuscripts emphasizes the long research history they are now a part of while the online research opportunities including access to Archives West reveals how contemporary research benefits from an ever-expanding access to materials.

Linda Long and I plan to meet to find ways to incorporate archival research into the Honors Program.

Potential Transfer Agreements with UO & OSU

This fall I have been working to increase the number of articulation and transfer agreements the Honors Program has with four-year schools. We currently have excellent agreements with Portland State University’s Honors College, Southern Oregon University’s Honors College, and Washington State Vancouver’s University Scholars Honors Program. I recently met with representatives at  the University of Oregon (UO) and Oregon State University (OSU), and I appreciate the direction our conversations have taken.

A few weeks ago, I met with Karen Sprague, the Interim Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education at UO. She was very interested in finding ways to support Lane’s honors students when they transfer to UO and to explore opportunities for them that might encourage them to transfer there. We are looking into automatic acceptance at the UO for our honors graduates, the chance to work in a science lab in the summer before they begin taking classes at UO, and supports specifically designed for transfer students. Dean Livelybrooks has already shared information about the science lab opportunity, and I’m meeting with three of our honors science faculty next week to discuss it. I’m also meeting with Justine Carpenter, the Director of Nontraditional and Veterans Engagement and Success.

University of Oregon

University of Oregon

Yesterday, I traveled to OSU to meet with several people: LeeAnn Baker, the University Honors College’s (UHC) Director of Student Success and Engagement; Gildha Cumming, the UHC’s Director of Admissions and Communications; Kayleen Salchenberg, OSU’s Transfer Students Services Manager; and Tara Williams, the Associate Dean of the UHC. OSU already offers many benefits to transfer students. These include campus housing and childcare at reasonable rates, a new automatic award of $2500 for students transferring with a 3.75 GPA and 36 hours of college credit, and the Degree Partnership Program. We considered ways to expand these benefits and discussed additional funding for our transfer students. We also plan to raise student awareness of the opportunities available at OSU, and Kayleen will visit the Honors Invitation to Inquiry Seminar this winter to talk with the students. Once we know students are applying to the University Honors College, we can then determine if there are elements of the application process that pose particular challenges and address those.

Oregon State University

Oregon State University

The conversations with UO and OSU have been very positive, and I’m encouraged that we will be able to offer Lane’s honors students an increased number of articulation and transfer agreements in the next year.