Author Archives: Ce Rosenow

Honors & Phi Theta Kappa Info Session

This week, Casey Reid and I organized an information session for the Honors Program and Phi Theta Kappa. Nine people attended our event. In addition to serving as an information session, this event fulfilled the honors orientation requirement for students in the program.

At this event, we reviewed the benefits of these two honors opportunities, the requirements for each, and the ways in which participating in both could be especially beneficial for students planning to transfer to four-year schools.

We also introduced students to the Honors Librarian, Claire Dannenbaum (far right) and the Honors Writing Tutor, student Sabrina Piccolo (third from right):

A highlight was presenting Sabrina and Holly Kolodziejczak (second from right) with their honors medallions for successfully completing the Honors Program!

And of course, we had lots of snacks!

Casey and I will be offering several more information sessions before the end of this academic year, hopefully in our soon-to-be-realized Honors and PTK Student Lounge!

Honors Update: First Term of the New Honors Program

Starting in September 2018, we brought back the Honors Program and have made a lot of progress creating opportunities for students! 

Honors Classes

This year, we are offering the following honors classes:

  • ANTH 102_H: World Archaeology
  • ART 115_H: Basic Design
  • BI 101_H: General Biology
  • COMM 111_H: Fundamentals of Public Speaking
  • COOP 280_H: Co-op Ed: Service Learning
  • ENG 105_H: Introduction to Literature: Drama
  • ENG 106_H: Introduction to Literature: Poetry
  • WR 121_H: Introduction to Academic Writing
  • WR 122_H: Composition: Argument, Style and Research
  • WR 227_H: Technical Writing
  • WR 242_H: Introduction to Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Partnering with Phi Theta Kappa

The Director of the Writing Center, Casey Reid, and I are now the advisors for Lane’s Sigma Zeta Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa. We will be bringing the chapter back in winter of 2019! Honors students can hold leadership positions in PTK to fulfill their experiential learning requirement. Also, we will hold workshops for both Honors and PTK to help students build and maintain ePortfolios, create research posters, and develop their resumes. 

Transfer Agreements

We reinstated our agreement with Portland State University’s Honors College. Students completing our program can transfer directly into their college as juniors.

We are in the process of reinstating our agreement with Southern Oregon University’s Honors College.

We are also in conversation with the University of Oregon’s Clark Honors College, which is interested in developing a transfer agreement with us.

Watch for more details on these last two agreements and other developments in 2019!

Capstone Seminar Students Visit the Mike Rose Writing Loft

The students in the Capstone Seminar are engaged in a group research project in preparation for a panel presentation in Week 9. The panel will be part of the college’s newly expanded Undergraduate Research Fair.

As part of their work, they met with Holly Kolodziejczak  in the new Michael Rose Writing Loft. Holly is a writing coach employed by the Lane Writing Center. She is also an honors student and completed the Capstone Seminar last year. 

The students asked questions, and Holly also offered various tips based on her group’s experience in the seminar. This conversation was so much more productive and seemed to have a greater impact than simply having me and my co-instructor, Stacey Kiser, offer advice.

The students will present their research findings at 2:00, May 30, in the Center Building’s Hoagland Commons on Main Campus.

HONORS IS BACK!

On Wednesday, I met with Executive Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences Jennifer Frei and Executive Dean of Student Affairs Kerry Levett to discuss the Honors Program. The meeting was at Jennifer’s invitation, and both she and Kerry wanted to figure out how to maintain a scaled back version of the Honors Program and an active Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) chapter. We decided to bring the issue up in a meeting that Stacey Kiser and I had scheduled with the President,  Interim Vice President, and Jennifer on Thursday morning to discuss expanding undergraduate research at Lane.

When Jennifer, Stacey, and I met with President Marge Hamilton and Interim Vice President Jane Harmon on Thursday, we began by discussing undergraduate research at Lane. Both Marge and Jane were very supportive of expanding this high impact practice for Lane’s students and directed us to move forward with the work.

Before we could bring up the Honors Program, however, Marge brought it up. She made it absolutely clear that she wanted an Honors Program and a PTK chapter at the college and would support bringing both of these honors opportunities back for students.

I’ll post more information in a few weeks after attending the initial planning meeting scheduled for early April. For now, it’s time to celebrate!

HONORS IS BACK!

Honors Independent Study

This term, we did not have the enrollment to run the HON 201_H Invitation to Inquiry Seminar. The class is a prerequisite for the HON 202_H Capstone Seminar in the spring, and it is also required for program completion. We waived these requirements so that the students can still take Capstone and finish the program.

I felt, however, that the students who had signed up for the class were missing one of the key opportunities of being in the program. In place of the seminar, I’ve arranged for independent study (HON 298_H) with these students to try to approximate some of what they would have been able to do in the seminar.

The independent study class is only one credit, so I’ve needed to be sensitive to workload. The primary requirements for the class are:

  • several one-hour, discussion-based meetings during the term
  • readings on critical thinking and on the role of Western research in colonization
  • building an ePortfolio

While it’s not a perfect solution, I do think that the students will be better prepared for Capstone. 

I also have to say that it has been so much fun meeting in my office and having discussions about the readings! Each time, I’m reminded that one of the benefits of honors education is that honors students teach each other and the students and instructor all learn.

Honors Program Still In Question

I’ve been waiting to post until there was more clarity about whether a scaled down version of the Honors Program would be allowed to continue. I can share what I know at this point.

Last fall, the administration considered having the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) advisor for our Sigma Zeta Chapter also do a small amount of program administration.

To date, however, the new PTK advisor has not been hired and the program coordination has not been aligned with PTK work.

The existing honors classes continue to be offered this year so that current honors students can finish the program.

More as I know it . . .

Honors Event Inspires Guest Speaker to Further Inquiry

Last February, the Honors Program invited scholar, Sharon Schuman, to campus to discuss her book, Freedom and Dialogue in a Polarized World.

Sharon Schuman

As I described in a post after the event, Schuman extends Mikhail Bakhtin’s work on the dialogic nature of language to the concept of freedom. She argues that freedom is dialogic. The more perspectives one can see from, the freer one will be.

This event was well-attended by students, faculty, staff, and members of the Eugene community. During the Q&A session, a student who was not in the Honors Program commented that Schuman seemed to think that polarization was a bad thing. She asked a thought-provoking question: “What’s wrong with polarization?”

Schuman was so intrigued by the student’s question that she continued thinking about it and whether there were positive aspects to polarization. Several months later, she wrote an essay in response. It was published in today’s Register-Guard newspaper as a Guest Viewpoint: “Polarization is Easy; Seeing the Other Side is Hard.” She will also post it on her website, Dialogic Freedom, and I’ll link to that post, as well, once it is up.

The Schuman event and follow-up essay exemplify so much of what is valuable about honors education at community colleges and specifically at Lane Community College:

  • encouraging student engagement in intellectual and creative activities with prominent scholars;
  • creating spaces for learning outside the classroom;
  • bringing together members of the Lane and Eugene communities to consider contemporary scholarship that is highly-relevant to today’s world;
  • engaging diverse perspectives; and
  • leading to increased critical thinking and broadening the discussion to a significantly wider audience.

In short, the event supported the college’s Core Learning Outcomes and its Core Themes. It is one of many examples of how honors contributes to mission fulfillment and of the valuable service that Lane Community College provides to our community. 

Update on Honors Program Status

I have been focusing on undergraduate research, student opportunities, and student accomplishments in my last posts because those topics represent so much of what honors education is about.

Unfortunately, I do need to acknowledge that this month the Board of Education officially accepted the college’s budget proposal, including the elimination of the Honors Program. Next year, we will offer the existing honors classes, including the two honors seminars, so that students can complete the program and be eligible for transfer agreements. There will be no program coordination and no honors events, just the classes. After next year, the program will be gone.

I plan to continue blogging here about honors at Lane and honors education in general through next year.

Undergraduate Research Materials

As a follow-up to my recent post on the Honors Spring Symposium, I’m sharing photos of the research poster and pamphlets created by the Capstone Seminar students as ways to share some of their research findings:

Morality Legislation Research Poster

Research Pamphlet Containing Information on Alcohol Education and Sexual Assault

Spring 2017 Symposium

What an event! The students presented their research findings in two sessions separated by a short break. The first group — Sam, Hayden, Holly, Emma, and Paige — addressed morality legislation in a panel discussion. They described their methodology, used women’s reproductive rights as their primary case study, and then elaborated on how the methodology could be applied to thinking critically about other moral issues that have been, or continue to be, legislated.

Morality Legislation Discussion Panel

The second group, Jack and Gus, opened with a cover of Lady Gaga’s song, “Til It Happens to You,” performed by Jack.

Jack just after finishing his song.

This performance was followed by Gus reading his paper and sharing slides describing many facts and statistics on alcohol education at universities and its potential impact on reducing sexual assaults.

Gus presenting his paper.

This segment concluded with Jack describing the shortcomings of colleges and universities in addressing the realities of alcohol consumption by student and performing a demonstration measuring the recommended amount of alcohol safely consumed per hour vs the actual yet often unrecognized amount of alcohol contained in a typical solo cup of Jungle Juice.

The students also created a research poster, brochure, and website. I will post links to them once their are available.

I have no doubt that these students will continue to pursue research interests during their time at Lane and at their transfer institutions. I hope they will also decide to pursue graduate degrees given their intellects, research skills, and passion for learning.